FAQ

FAQ FAQ FAQ

FAQ

Will moving from three grant cycles to two reduce the grant dollars available?

Why change from three rounds to two?

Will the Trust provide operating support for new organizations?

Have your guidelines changed in the Helping People in Need priority area?

Have your guidelines changed in the Protecting Animals and Nature priority area?

Have your guidelines changed in the Enriching Community Life priority area?

Will the Trust accept capital (building and endowment) support requests?

Why are we required to contact a Trust program officer before submitting a proposal for funding?

How far ahead should I contact a Trust program officer about submitting a proposal?

Our organization received a grant last year; may we apply for another one this year?

With only two cycles per year, how often can an organization submit a proposal?

May I submit a hard copy proposal to the Trust?

Can an organization submit a proposal containing multiple requests?

Does having an endowment hurt the probability of an organization being
funded?

Does receiving United Way funding hurt an organization’s prospects to
be considered for funding?

Is there an advantage in building a joint proposal between organizations
in Indiana and Arizona?

Will the Trust fund partial amounts of the full amount requested?

If two organizations are collaborating on a project, should each organization
submit a separate proposal?

Does an organization need its own 501(c)(3)?

What if an organization has applied for 501(c)(3) status, but has not
received its ruling?

What is the grant size range?

Who makes the final decisions on grant requests, and where do these people
live?

Do naming opportunities give an organization a better chance for funding?

Does the Trust fund medical research?

Does the Trust make multi-year grants?

If an organization receives a notice of funding, how long will it be
before a check is distributed?

Will the Trust accept proposals from individual branches or clubs of larger
entities, such as Boy Scouts of America, YMCA, or Boys & Girls
Club?

Will the Trust accept proposals from local chapters of national organizations?

Will the Trust accept proposals from government programs and/or agencies
serving the mission of the Trust?

Will the Trust accept proposals from public schools?

Will the Trust accept proposals from private independent schools?

Will the Trust accept proposals from religious organizations?

Do religious organizations need their own Section 501(c)(3) determination
letter?

Does the Trust accept proposals from colleges and universities?

Our college (or university) is involved in a project with the community
or neighborhood. Is the Trust still interested in receiving proposals
of this type?

My organization’s leadership is in transition. Will this factor into the Trust’s consideration of a proposal request?

 

Will the Trust allocate a certain percentage each grant cycle to each
specific program category?
There is no plan to do so. Funding decisions will be based upon
the merit of the proposals received and our sense of community needs.
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Will moving from three grant cycles to two reduce the grant dollars available?
No. The amount of funding available annually is totally dependent upon the performance of the Trust’s investment assets, not the number of grant cycles. return to top

Why change from three rounds to two?
The change allows grants programs staff more time to work with applicants to help refine requests, as well as provide more time for the grantee community to interact with Trust staff to develop results-based proposals.
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Will the Trust provide operating support for new organizations?
The Trust will consider operating support for former Trust grantees that can document major changes in income generation that threaten their future existence.
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Have your guidelines changed in the Helping People in Need priority area?
Yes. The Trust seeks applications that can demonstrate the progression of individuals or families along the continuum towards self-sufficiency and/or increased functioning.
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Have your guidelines changed in the Protecting Animals and Nature priority area?
No. The Trust remains very interested in receiving proposals for animal welfare and the environment. However, the new program description underscores the Trust’s interest in strengthening bonds with animals and the natural world.
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Have your guidelines changed in the Enriching Community Life priority area?
Yes. The new program description includes the Trust’s interest in building the capacity of the nonprofit sector in Indianapolis and Phoenix.
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Will the Trust accept capital (building and endowment) support requests?
The Trust will consider capital support for organizations that seek immediate capital improvements to continue or expand services.  The Trust will not accept unsolicited proposals for capital campaigns, either for building or endowment purposes.
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Why do we have to contact a Trust program officer before submitting a proposal for funding?
Contact with our staff will help determine the viability of funding requests and conversely, save you time and effort preparing proposals that do not fit our guidelines.
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How far ahead should I contact a Trust program officer about submitting a proposal?
The earlier you make contact, the better. However, in order to give you the necessary attention you deserve, please make certain to contact our office at least one month prior to the proposal deadline posted on the Trust’s website.
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Our organization received a grant last year; may we apply for another one this year?
The Trust must have received and reviewed your evaluation report post-grant term before your organization is eligible to apply for a new grant. Consult a Trust program officer for further clarification if you have any uncertainty. return to top

With only two cycles per year, how often can an organization submit a proposal?
Organizations still may submit a proposal only once a year. return to top

May I submit a hard copy proposal to the Trust?
No. The Trust only accepts preliminary proposals submitted electronically through its website.
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Can an organization submit a proposal containing multiple requests?
No. The Trust prefers to accept only one idea per application.
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Does having an endowment hurt the probability of an organization being funded?
Not specifically, but we will review its size and how earnings
are being applied to determine how critical a grant from the Trust
would be to the organization.
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Does receiving United Way funding hurt an organization’s prospects to be considered for funding?
Not specifically, but we will review its size and how earnings
are being applied to determine how critical a grant from the Trust
would be to the organization.
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Is there an advantage in building a joint proposal between organizations in Indiana and Arizona?
No. Unless there is a very logical reason to apply together, don’t bother to attempt it.
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Will the Trust fund partial amounts of the full amount requested?
Yes. Because of limited funds, the Trust will consider offering
a grant in an amount less than requested.
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If two organizations are collaborating on a project, should each organization submit a separate proposal?
No. Only one organization should submit the proposal, but a letter
of collaboration from the other organization should be included.
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Does an organization need its own 501(c)(3)?
We prefer that an organization have its 501(c)(3) letter from
the IRS. However, there may be cases where another organization
has agreed to serve as the fiscal agent. In such instances, a letter
stating this agreement between organizations and the reason for
it must be submitted with the proposal.
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What if an organization has applied for 501(c)(3) status, but has not
received its ruling?
An organization must have its preliminary ruling letter from
the IRS prior to submitting a proposal unless it is submitting under
another organization’s 501(c)(3), as stated above.
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What is the grant size range?
There is no “set” range. As reference, in 2013 the Trust awarded grants ranging from $9,000 to $500,000.
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Who makes the final decisions on grant requests, and where do these people live?
The three Trustees make final decisions. The staff presents recommendations to them for consideration. Two of the Trustees have homes in Phoenix, Arizona and the third Trustee resides in Indianapolis, Indiana.
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Do naming opportunities give an organization a better chance for funding?
No.
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Does the Trust fund medical research?
No.
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Does the Trust make multi-year grants?
In some cases it will, depending upon the amount of funding and the purpose of the request.
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If an organization receives a notice of funding, how long will it be before a check is distributed?
Following the Trust’s receipt of your signed grant agreement, electronic transfer can be sent immediately after processing.  Checks will generally be available within 30 to 60 days.
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Will the Trust accept proposals from individual branches or clubs of
larger entities, such as Boy Scouts of America, YMCA, or Boys &
Girls Club?
No. The Trust will accept only one proposal per year from the
parent organization. For these purposes, the “parent organization”
generally refers to that entity to which the IRS has issued a Section
501(c)(3) determination letter.
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Will the Trust accept proposals from local chapters of national organizations?
Yes, if the funds requested are used within that local community
and the entity has an independent governing body that is responsible
for funding and governance in the greater Indianapolis or Phoenix
area. An example of this kind of organization or group is a local
affiliate of the American Red Cross.
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Will the Trust accept proposals from government programs and/or agencies serving the mission of the Trust?
Only by rare exception will the Trust fund organizations that are government agencies.
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Will the Trust accept proposals from public schools?
Only by rare exception will the Trust consider proposals from K-12 public schools supported through public funds, which includes charter schools. Further, the Trust will accept a proposal only if authorized by or submitted by the school’s district’s central office, and the Trust will accept only one proposal per year per school district. The Trust will not fund individual schools, nor will it support requests for buildings and equipment or for general operating purposes.
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Will the Trust accept proposals from private independent schools?
Only by rare exception will the Trust consider proposals from K-12 private and/or tuition-based schools. Further, the Trust will accept a proposal only if authorized by or submitted by the school’s central governing body. In all instances, the applicant must have its own IRS Section 501(c)(3) determination letter. The Trust will not support requests for buildings and equipment or for general operating purposes.
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Will the Trust accept proposals from religious organizations?
The Trust does not support sectarian religious activities or
sectarian religious facilities. However, churches and other religious
organizations may submit proposals if their activities benefit the
larger community and decisions to accept clients are not made on
the basis of religious belief and/or affiliation. An example is
Lutheran Social Services.
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Do religious organizations need their own Section 501(c)(3) determination letter?
Please refer first to the above question and answer. If a religious
organization otherwise meets the criteria in the Q & A above,
the Trust may under limited circumstances fund an organization that
does not have its own Section 501(c)(3) determination letter. While
the Trust prefers that organizations have their own Section 501(c)(3)
determination letter from the IRS, it recognizes that many local
religious organizations are part of a group exemption, and in those
cases, proposals generally should be authorized by or submitted
by the central governing body. If the central governing body is
a national organization that has a local affiliation (as described
in the Q & A above), then the local entity should apply through
the organization that represents the greater Indianapolis or Phoenix
area as a whole. An example of this kind of organization or group
is the Archdiocese of Indianapolis.
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Does the Trust accept proposals from colleges and universities?
The Trust will not accept unsolicited proposals from colleges
and universities for operating or capital requests. (The latter
includes endowments for professorial chairs, faculty training and
research, scholarships, and building campaigns.) However, the Trust
will continue to accept proposals through its regular grant cycles
for support of projects that link higher education institutions to their
communities. From time to time, the Trust may consider circulating requests for proposals on a case-by-case basis.
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Our college (or university) is involved in a project with the community or neighborhood. Is the Trust still interested in receiving proposals of this type?
Yes. The Trust will continue to consider these types of requests.
However, if the proposal is submitted by the educational institution,
then it must be authorized by the central administration and only
one request per year will be considered from that organization or
the community nonprofit agency that is the project partner.
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My organization’s leadership is in transition. Will this factor into the Trust’s consideration of a proposal request?
Yes, an unexpected change in or current vacancy of a key leadership position (e.g., an executive director or president/CEO) could affect whether the Trust will consider an organization’s proposal request.
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